DOI 10.5414/CNP74S095

Clinical Nephrology, Volume 74 - Supplement 1 (95 - 98)

Hypovitaminosis D, neighborhood poverty, and progression of chronic kidney disease in disadvantaged populations

R. Mehrotra1, 2, K. Norris2, 3
1 Division of Nephrology, Hypertension, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Center at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance, 2 Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 3 Office of Research, Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Abstract

In the United States, there are significant racial disparities in the incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease. The disparities are greatest for the Blacks and the magnitude of disparity is significantly greater than is evident from the incidence and prevalence data of end-stage renal disease – early stage chronic kidney disease is less common in Blacks and during that stage, mortality rate is significantly higher for that racial group. Recent studies have identified a genetic predisposition for non-diabetic renal disease among Blacks. However, genetic factors explain only part of the higher risk and the racial disparities are a result of a complex interplay of biology and sociology. Herein we focus on two factors and their role in explaining the higher risk for progression of chronic kidney disease among Blacks – one biologic (vitamin D deficiency) and one sociologic (neighborhood poverty). A greater Understanding of these factors is important in order to reduce the racial disparities in the United States.

Author Details

Authors

  • R. Mehrotra1
  • 2
  • K. Norris2
  • 3

Departments

  • 1 Division of Nephrology, Hypertension, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Center at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance,
  • 2 Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA,
  • 3 Office of Research, Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Free Full Text

 

Rights / Permissions

This section will be available soon


Shopping Overview
Type Qtty Price
Your basket is empty
View Cart